Mercy Regional Health Center
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Venogram

What is a venogram?
What happens during the exam?
How should I prepare for the procedure?
What should I wear?
What happens after the test?
What are the risks?
What will I experience during the exam?
Who will perform the procedure?
When is this exam given?


What is a venogram?
A venogram is a special x-ray procedure that is performed with a contrast agent (x-ray dye) to help the radiologist see the deep veins in the leg and groin.

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What happens during the exam?
You will be lying on the x-ray table on your back. A tourniquet will be placed around your ankle and knee. The radiologist will then inject the contrast agent into a vein on the top of your foot. This may cause a temporary burning sensation in your foot.

A technique called fluoroscopy will be used to allow the radiologist to watch x-ray images on a TV monitor. The radiologist will take a series of x-ray films from your ankle to your hip. After the images are checked for quality, the needle is removed from your foot and compression is applied to stop the bleeding.

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How should I prepare for the procedure?
You should not eat or drink anything for four hours prior to the exam.
 
If there is a possibility that you are pregnant, please inform your physician before the procedure, as the procedure may have to be postponed or cancelled.

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What should I wear?
Most patients are asked to wear a hospital gown. You will also need to remove all jewelry.

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What happens after the test?
The contrast agent will be absorbed into your blood, collected by your kidneys and excreted with your urine. The contrast agent will not affect the color of your urine.
 
You may immediately resume your normal diet. You are encouraged to drink several extra glasses of water within the next 24 hours to help your body remove the contrast agent.

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What are the risks?
While there are no adverse effects for the majority of patients, there is a small possibility you could be allergic to the contrast agent. Most allergic reactions are mild and consist of itching and hives.
 
If a more severe reaction — such as irregularity of the heart beat, drop in blood pressure or difficulty breathing — were to occur, treatment would be initiated immediately. Please notify your physician if you experience any of these severe reactions.

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What will I experience during the exam?
As the contrast agent is injected, you may experience a metallic taste in your mouth and a mild warm feeling throughout your body. These sensations are temporary and do not indicate an allergic reaction.
 
However, if you experience itchiness, swelling of the face or throat, difficulty breathing or chest pain, you should tell the radiologist immediately.

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Who will perform the procedure?
A radiologist will perform this procedure. An x-ray technologist may assist.

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When is this exam given?
This exam is used to study various conditions of the veins, including blood-clot occlusions, phlebitis and malformations.

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